Posts Tagged ‘viral’

2010 in review

January 2, 2011

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

About 3 million people visit the Taj Mahal every year. This blog was viewed about 34,000 times in 2010. If it were the Taj Mahal, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

 

In 2010, there were 32 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 110 posts. There were 152 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 10mb. That’s about 3 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was October 1st with 2,481 views. The most popular post that day was 01 October — ish.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were facebook.com, sewmamasew.com, mail.yahoo.com, theslapdashsewist.blogspot.com, and thehappyzombie.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for ibol, iraqi bundles of love, kitteh, funny rumors to spread, and ibol guy.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

01 October — ish October 2010
14 comments

2

IB♥L II: Give A Little August 2010
325 comments

3

Building a bundle August 2009
649 comments

4

What to send August 2009
342 comments

5

FAQ August 2009
236 comments

 

Pretty cool, huh?  Here’s to 2010!

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Laying the groundwork

November 13, 2010

One of the things I did this week, to start to lay the groundwork for an IBOL3D, was to actually reach out to the media. Well, sort of.

I contacted my alma mater, specifically the alumni folks who publish the nice, polished, glossy magazine. It’s very nice, very slick. I sent them a short note, told them that there may be an IBOL3D in the works, and that if they take a look, they might find that the project reflects a lot of the things that the school holds in high regards. Their initial feedback from both positive and enthusiastic.

I also reached out to the national office of my fraternity. Same deal — alumni, polished magazine, etc. I said that IBOL3D might actually happen, but I also pointed out links between the Army values and the fraternity values (yes, the fraternity as well-defined values). They were positive and enthusiastic, and have asked questions, asked for photos, etc. I am confident that they’ll publish something in the next couple of months.

But that’s it so far. I think these are good things — laying the groundwork now for an effort in the spring or summer. Should I draft something generic, for people to use in their guild newsletters? Should there be a deliberate once-a-month type update thing about IBOL3D, where it stands, what’s coming up, so that people can blatantly copy and paste it and send it around?

IB♥L II: The Flier

September 7, 2010

You asked, I delivered.

Here is the link to a two-page flier I have made, for IBOL II.  If you need something to print out and hand out at guild meetings, sewing bees, dinners with the in-laws, I hope this will suffice.

If not, let me know.  With the embedded photos, it’s a whopping 22mb — which seems like a lot.  Do I need to make that smaller?  At that size, you’re certainly not going to email it to anyone (but then again, it’s easier to just point people to the website).

IBOL, and being a geek

August 29, 2010

I’ll let you in on a little secret. Well, if you read the IBOL book, it may not be a surprise.

I’m a total geek, and I love having access to the raw back-end statistics about how IBOL floats around the internet.

In IBOL I last year, the whole thing started with me just creating the blog. That was it. There was no following, there were no fans. There was no Facebook page, there was no key word to search for. Just a new blog on WordPress.  10 views one day, then up to a few hundred. And then, boom, there’d be an explosion, two or three or four times as much traffic in a single day — and I could dig and see where it was all coming from.

Some website would have made mention of it. Some blogger would have posted something about. There had been a guild meeting, or an email to members. Or it had made it into a new forum or online group.

Often, it would be a one-day spike, but after a while, they’d start to overlap and the statistics would stay elevated. Hundreds of visits a day became thousands of visits a day. And it all went through the roof when things like newspaper articles started, and when the quilts.com crew sent out an amazing email to everyone headed to the Houston Quilt Festival.

I learned to watch things like this Google link, but the WordPress stuff also has a section where I can secret see who is linking to IBOL, and from where people are coming to the site.   It was easy to spot the big, well connected websites and blogs that were sending lots and lots of people to IBOL, but I’ll be honest – I most treasured find the little things.

So, yeah.  Neat to see all this again.  Almost a week into IBOL II, and there have been a little over 5000 visits to the blog (4 days in the 400 to 700 visitors per day range, and one day at 1700).  There have been a good 225  or some comments left on the website, and I’ve seen more than a fair share of references to people passing along the address in their guild and group.  Having been through IBOL I, this all means something to me — IBOL II is going to be just fine.

Sew, Mama, Sew

August 23, 2009

But really, Whoa, Mama, WHOA!

As you may recall, a while ago I asked on this site if anyone was in the fabric store business. I wondered who was in a position to build bundles at or near cost.

Why? There are people out there in this world, like most all of my guy friends, who would probably be willing to support IBOL but who don’t have a stash into which they can raid. How could they, too, easily help with this?

The answer? Sew, Mama, Sew has set up this site. Anyone can visit the site, use their credit card, and push bundles of love this way. [UPDATE: She blogged the details, here]

Iraqi Bundle of Love
For your contribution of fifteen dollars we will send one Iraqi Bundle of Love to US soldiers who will distribute the bundles to Iraqi families and sewing co-ops. One bundle will include:

* 5 yards of new fabric
* 16 sewing needles in a case
* 32 pearlized pins on a wheel
* 1 tomato pincushion
* 1 pair folding scissors
* 1 150 yd spool white thread

The cost of shipping is included in the price!

So, I think this is about the coolest thing ever. EVER. $15 for 5 yards of fabrics, plus others goodies, shipping included, from Sew Mama Sew. And they have enough to do 150 of these.

150. Remember when I thought 30 bundles was going to make this project a success?

I kid you not — this takes my breath away. This has been SSP1 — Super Secret Project #1 — and in the works for a few days, but it is still amazing to see it online and working. Please feel free to help pass this news around, and please feel free to swing by the Sew, Mama, Sew blog and leave them a comment. Pass it on Facebook, send it on Twitter.

Whoa. Just whoa. If SSP2 turns out half as amazing as this, I’m going to see a medic to give me CPR.

Well, this didn’t take long

August 17, 2009

The bundle on the bottom is from Mrs. IBOL Guy. I was expecting something from her early on, as she was in on this project before it even had a name.

That pretty, wonderful, beautiful bundle on the top? Yeah — I have no idea who it’s from. I mean, sure, there’s a return address and a name, but it’s not from anyone who left a comment here, or anyone who contacted me.

And I think that’s totally awesome. Want to know the best part? They included a little note on the box, too.

The week in review

August 16, 2009
IBOL Kitteh say, Meh.

IBOL Kitteh say, "Meh."

On this quiet Sunday morning, I thought I’d try and wrap up a few loose ideas and other things.

1. Thanks. Holy smokes, THANKS. I really thought that success for this project was going to be measures in tens, not hundreds. My units is trying to figure out where to put all these bundles until we start making deliveries — and yes, this is a marvelous problem to have!

2. Yes, by all means — I am totally OK with you giving the mail address to people. I ask a couple of things — a) I am trying to keep the actual address off of the web, since this thing only runs for so long (and since I leave not long after it ends), and 2) you pass along that stuff should be post-marked by 7 Sept. I think that probably applies for international mail, too. If you’re on Palau, well, I’d send stuff sooner rather than later.

3. Has anyone convinced their local fabric / yard place to support this by selling stuff at cost (or darn tootin’ cheap)? Please let me know. I would love, love, love to find a fabric / yard place doing this. It’s gotta be possible, right?

4. What if that store had local volunteers who built actual bundles? And took Visa? Suddenly, the non-quilting / knitting people of the world — stop laughing! They really do exist! — would have an easy way to pile on board, too. I could soooo sell that idea to nerds. And to people to go to sock week dressed as Darth Vader. And rock stars. The rest of the world.

5. Jacquie posted some wonderful eye candy about what she’s sending (here), and in the comments, Rachel made what was probably a tongue-in-cheek offer to send 20 yards for fabric in exchange for one of the pieces heading her way instead. Which might actually happen. Which got me thinking — one yard becomes 20? Really? How else is this thing mutating in weird, wonderful ways?

6. There’s a Flickr tag for this whole thing: iraqibundlesoflove. Over on Facebook, I am linking to some of the many photos of bundles that people are posting to the web, mostly on their own websites. And I gotta say — wow, they are stunning. And very popular with the cats, since they seem to be almost magnetically attracted to these bundles, too. Probably because the bundle represents a pile that they can either 1) sit on, or 2) barf on.

7. Fans of the blog Happy Zombie might want to swing by JoCo‘s site here and download the zombie song. Yes, it’s legal to download this (even in the US), and yes, it’s free.

8. The first day this site was up, 10 people visited. And I bet they all shared the same family name as well. And Google returned no results when you searched for the phrase Iraqi Bundles of Love. Friday, the site was hammered by just a hair under 2000 hits, and what seemed like 1000 people leaving comments asking for the address (Ok, it was probably just 50). There’s been a ton of visitors from the US and Canada. And Germany, my other home. And now some from Australia (!). And the UK. And Norway. It warms my heart plenty to have so many, from so many places, offer to help out this US Soldier. So, I will leave you with one of my favorite photos of all time, that I took in Flam, Norway, back when we were expecting IBOL Kid #2. Maybe it’ll warm our heart, too.

And for the record, yes, you can now go do your part to stimulate the international economy by shopping for material to re-stock your stash.

How did you get here

August 12, 2009

This whole IBOL thing started with a couple of emails to a few family and friends, and then me quietly creating this website.  There really hasn’t been a lot of fanfare or hard pressed effort on my part to spread the word or sell this concept; I’ve more or less left it up to you all to get the word out about this crazy dream of mine.

Oh, and by the way, you all sure seem to be doing a damn fine job at that.  A slow day has been 300 hits on this site, and a big day was over 750.  Add to that other folks who have only popped up on email, or through Facebook, and it’s healthy numbers for a viral web based efforts.

So, where are you all coming from?  Well, I have numbers.  Having read The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, I see these kinds of statistics as being indicators of who the Connectors are.

At the top of the list is some gal named Kristin La Flamme.  What’s up with that?  After that, it’s Robin.  Apparently, my Hawaii connections are indeed pretty strong.  I find it interesting that Facebook and Twitter are both in the Top 5 — in this modern world, I kind of expected they would be.  Personally, I like that Google Reader is in the Top 10 — I love Google Reader and rely on it to follow about 200 different RSS feeds (it’s just that awesome).

But the bottom line is, no matter how you got here, well, thank you for getting here.  This thing has caught on, indeed, and the feedback, good comments and constructive additions and ideas have been just great.  I’m just waiting for the weather to improve and the mail deliveries to resume!

Without further ado,  may present to you the top ten sites that push visitors here:

kristinlaflamme.com/musings/
simplyrobin.blogspot.com
facebook.com
acolourfulworld.blogspot.com
twitter.com
cardsforheroes.org/homefront-blog
google.com/reader/view
quilting.craftgossip.com
fabricsnquilts.blogspot.com
cabteam.ning.com